CARS 3 – What the critics are saying about it!

cars 366% of critics give it a positive rating.

Critics Consensus: Cars 3 has an unexpectedly poignant story to go with its dazzling animation, suggesting Pixar’s most middle-of-the-road franchise may have a surprising amount of tread left.

 

 

 

The final chapter of the trilogy has saved the best for last and will at least deflect the most serious concerns of those who think this series has taken too many extra laps.

June 16, 2017 | Rating: 3/4 | Full Review…

Onscreen and in the audience, youth will be served.

June 16, 2017 | Rating: 1/5 | Full Review…

It’s a reasonably diverting, somewhat sluggish attempt to reinstall the “heart” of the first installment.

June 16, 2017 | Rating: B- | Full Review…

It’s all well and good for the under-12s, but this movie never packs the kind of emotional punch we know Pixar is capable of.

June 16, 2017 | Rating: 3/5 | Full Review…

We get a lot of repetitive racetrack scenes – only a demolition derby stands out for the inventiveness of its animation – and a familiar message about believing in yourself.

June 16, 2017 | Rating: 2/4 | Full Review…

“Cars 3” hums along the track, and while its heart and humor could use minor tune-ups, it does enough visually to earn a checkered flag and keep this franchise from the scrapheap – for now, at least.

June 16, 2017 | Rating: B- | Full Review…

 

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MEGAN LEAVEY – What the critics have to say about the film!

megan_leavey78% of the critics like the film.

“Megan Leavey” isn’t a big, or particularly surprising picture; it sketches out a simple story and then, reliably delivers.

June 9, 2017 | Rating: 3/4 | Full Review…

If you’re looking for a good cry, Megan Leavey gets the job done, I suppose. But it’s a bit like a wet kiss from a puppy.

June 9, 2017 | Rating: C+ | Full Review…

The film – the feature directorial debut for Gabriela Cowperthwaite, whose orcas-in-peril documentary, Blackfish, struck a nerve – treats the handler/dog relationship with respect, not cheap sensationalism.

June 9, 2017 | Rating: 2.5/4 | Full Review…

With a female-directed, female-driven film this small, criticizing it feels like beating a baby seal. While well intentioned, the human-and-dog interest story lacks narrative drive and star Kate Mara is a limp noodle.

June 9, 2017 | Rating: 2/4 | Full Review…

The emotion in Megan Leavey is not forced. It flows, up and down the leash, just like it’s supposed to.

June 9, 2017 | Rating: 3.5/4 | Full Review…

“Megan Leavey” works because it takes Leavey seriously as a character, and it studies her journey through her life and through the Marines before Rex is even a factor in the story.

June 9, 2017 | Rating: B+ | Full Review…

2016 Family Short Films

Submit your Family Film or Screenplay to the Festival: http://festivalforfamily.com

Watch the best of Family Short Films from 2016. CLICK and watch the winning readings: 


festival posterBIRTH WEAVING LIFE, 6min., Japan, Animation/Documentary
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterI AM DYSLEXIC, 6min. Norway, Animation/Music Video
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterGRANDMA: A TRUE STORY, 5min, UK, Animation/Family
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterPHANTOM CITY, 6min, Canada, Animation/Crime
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterTHE GRAVEYARD SHIFT, 2min, USA, Animation/Comedy
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterCACOPHONY, 2min, USA, Animation/Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterSISTERS, 4min, USA, Animation/Music Video
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterAFRO CRAB, 4min, Taiwan, Animation/Comedy
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterSTUTTER, 13min., USA, Family/Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterMAN’S BEST FRIEND, 7min. UK, Family/Animation
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festival poster
WHAT’S WEARING MUMMY, 15min, UK, Family/Comedy

WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterTHE GRENADE, 4min., Brazil, Experimental/Music
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterTHERE WAS A PLACE, 14min. Spain, Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival poster
FALLING STARS, 25min, Germany, Drama/Mystery

WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival poster
LATE, 5min, Canada, Drama

WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterSTUTTER, 13min., USA, Family/Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterCOLOR, 6min, USA, Experimental/Student
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterTHERE WAS A PLACE, 14min. Spain, Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival poster
WHAT’S WEARING MUMMY, 15min, UK, Family/Comedy

WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

festival posterBACK TO THE FUTURE?, 10min., USA, Comedy/Sci-Fi
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

September 2016 Film Festival


festival posterTHE CHAMPION, 17min, USA, Documentary
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

September 2016 Film Festival


festival posterAWESOME BEETLE’S COLORS, 3min, Latvia, Animation/Musical
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival poster
INSIDE, 3min., Belguim, Animation/Comedy

WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival poster5476 Miles, 4min, UK, Animation/Music Video
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival posterSPARROW DUET, 4min, USA, Animation/Experimental
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival posterA SMALL VOICE, 2min, UK, Animation/Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival posterBOTTOMLESS, 2min, USA, Animation/Biography
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festival posterSEA OF INK, 3min, USA, Animation/Drama
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festival poster1916, 4min, UK, Animation/Drama
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festival posterTIME SMASH, 2min., USA, Animation/Sci-Fi
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival poster
JAILBREAK, 1min., USA, Animation/Crime

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festival posterLUCY, 16min, Greece, Family/Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival posterGHOSTBOY, 9min., UK, Animation/Comedy
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK


festival poster101 CUPCAKES, 13min, Australia, Family/Drama
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

ACTORSILENCE, 3min, Russia, Romance/Drama
Short Film from July 2016 Film Festival

ACTORI LIKE YOU, 2min, Italy, Drama/Romance
Short Film from July 2016 Film Festival

ACTORJACK IS PRETTY, 26min, USA, Fantasy/Family
Watch Audience FEEDBACK Video of the Short Film from June 2016 Film Festival


festival poster1Minute Nature
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4min, Netherlands, Documentary/Animation


festival posterFROG
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17min, USA, Family/Drama


festival posterACE
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6min, UK, Family/Kids


festival posterFISH
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10min, USA, Family/Drama


festival posterCHATEAU SAUVIGNON: TERROIR
WATCH Audience FEEDBACK

13min, USA, Horror/Family

 

 

HARRY POTTER AND THE SORCERERS STONE, 2001

Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone MOVIE POSTER
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, 2001
Movie Reviews

Directed by Chris Columbus
Starring: Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint, Richard Harris, Alan Rickman, Maggie Smith, Robbie Coltrane, Ian Hart
Review by Emma Hutchings

SYNOPSIS: On his 11th birthday, Harry Potter is told he is a wizard and is invited to study at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. There he discovers that a dark power is attempting to rise again, the one responsible for the death of his parents and the lightning bolt scar on his forehead.

OSCAR NOMINEE for Best Art Direction – Set Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Music, Original Score

 

REVIEW:

Deposited on his Aunt and Uncle’s doorstep as a baby after the death of his parents, we revisit young Harry Potter aged 10 to discover he has lived a miserable life so far. He lives in a cupboard under the stairs and is badly mistreated. One day he surprisingly receives a letter but his Uncle doesn’t let him read it. This turns out to be a mistake, when, as the days go by, more and more letters arrive addressed to Harry. They are delivered by a large number of owls, who perch happily in front of the house, no doubt causing a few raised eyebrows in this little suburban neighbourhood.

The situation becomes so dire that Harry’s Uncle Vernon decides to uproot the family to a hut on a small island, hoping that will deter the sender of the letters. However, in the middle of the night, a half-giant named Hagrid bursts in and personally hands Harry his letter to read; he has been invited to study magic at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Leaving with Hagrid, Harry goes to Diagon Alley and withdraws some money his parents left him at Gringotts, a bank run by goblins, to purchase his supplies for school. He soon realises that in the wizarding world he is quite the celebrity.

The adult cast is a who’s who of British acting talent, giving the film an added bonus for grown-up viewers. They aren’t just clumsily thrown in either, they fit their roles perfectly. I for one can’t imagine anyone else playing Professor Snape; Alan Rickman does a brilliant job and for this film J.K. Rowling provided him with vital details of his character’s back story not revealed to readers until the final novel. As well as the main cast, there are also some big names in small roles: John Hurt plays wand-maker Mr Ollivander, John Cleese plays Nearly Headless Nick and Julie Walters plays Mrs Weasley.Harry Potter is a worldwide phenomenon. Understandably, the expectation for this first film in the series was huge and the pressure on the filmmakers to create a faithful adaptation for the fans was enormous. They didn’t disappoint. By February 2002 it was the second highest grossing film worldwide after Titanic. From watching the film you can tell that those involve care about telling the story. It is ideal for fans of the book who want to see their favourite scenes played out on screen.Once at Hogwarts, Harry uncovers a dark plot. The evil wizard who murdered his parents but lost his powers whilst trying to kill Harry as a child (leaving him with his scar) is attempting to restore himself to full strength. There is a valuable item he needs hidden at Hogwarts and a disciple there is determined to obtain it. Harry and his friends, Ron and Hermione, try to uncover the identity of this person while also trying to find out what the item is and where it is being kept so they can get to it first.

Oddly enough, I feel the film’s biggest weakness is that it is a very faithful adaptation. Although movies and books do have a close connection, they are still very different types of media and the best way to adapt a novel for the big screen isn’t necessarily to loyally translate it. Doing so means the director doesn’t use any of his own imagination or try to make his mark on the film. However, this almost certainly won’t affect children’s enjoyment and even most adult’s.

Overall, it is a very enjoyable fantasy adventure for all the family. The three child leads aren’t great (they can sometimes be seen mouthing each other’s lines, among other things) but you can tell there is potential for them to grow and develop as the films continue. And what better place to learn the art than surrounded by a vast number of talented elders in a celebrated film series that already has a huge army of fans

harry_potter_1

Movie Review: MILLIONS (2004)

Submit your Family Film or Screenplay to the Festival: http://festivalforfamily.com

MILLIONS
MILLIONS, 2004
Movie Reviews

Directed by Danny Boyle
Starring: Alex Etel, Lewis McGibbon, James Nesbitt
Review by MR Parodi

SYNOPSIS:

Millions is a funny and heartwarming story of two young English boys who have recently moved with their father, after the death of their mother. Damian, the youngest, discovers a bag filled with British Pound notes and shows his older brother, Anthony. England is about to join the European Union Monetary system, and the boys need to find a way to spend the money before it becomes obsolete. What will the boys decide to do with the money: invest it, donate it to the poor, or spend it frivolously?

REVIEW:

Danny Boyle revisits a familiar theme from his first two features, Shallow Grave and Trainspotting, in Millions – greed. This time around Boyle looks at it from a young pre-teen boys’ perspective, which makes for a delightful and entertaining comedy.

Millions begins with Ronnie (James Nesbitt) and his two boys packing up and moving out of their house, most likely due to the fact that their mother has recently passed away. Damian (Alex Etel) builds a cardboard fort by the train tracks near his new home, where he can fantasize about Saints, an obsession of his. Damian has memorized everything about every Saint. One day an enormous bag crushes Damian’s fort and it happens to be stuffed with British Pound notes. Damian shows the bag to his older brother, Anthony (Lewis McGibbon), and they decide not to tell anyone about the money due to “tax reasons”.

This decision marks the beginning of the movie’s conflict—Damian, the innocent and honest boy, wants to give the money to the poor, while Anthony views the money as a business opportunity. The boys must decide/think quickly because England is switching to the Euro currency within two weeks, and all British currency has to be converted, deposited in a bank account, or it will become useless. Anthony wants to invest in real estate, and Damian keeps giving the money away with the help of his imaginary Saints.

The boys find out through a schoolmate, whose father is a police officer, that an elaborate plan to steal money is the source of the bag that Damian found. The money was going to be burned by the government, but the thief threw out multiple bags of money from the train to be picked up later. The reality sharply contrasts with Damian’s belief that the bag was a miracle sent from God. Damian’s charitable actions then gain attention at school, and from a mysterious man who the boys run into at the train tracks by their house. The boys must reveal to their father, who is hardly around, that they found loads of cash. The mysterious man threatens Damian, who together with his family discovers how money can cloud one’s decisions and makes life difficult.

This film made me realize how much I enjoy Danny Boyle films. Boyle portrays the theme of greed in a fresh and whimsical way, which I found extremely interesting. The film is so contrary to Trainspotting, the only other Danny Boyle film I had seen when I first watched Millions, that it completely fulfilled and surpassed my expectations.

The characters and story, written by Frank Cottrell Boyce, are amazingly enchanting. Damian is such an innocent boy that you can’t help but love him. Furthermore, Alex Etel fits the role perfectly and is very believable. At the same time, Anthony is my favorite of the two boys. The character is a wise older brother who may be a little too concerned with money, but nonetheless has a good heart. The story is funny, quirky at times, and surprisingly heartwarming. If you enjoy British humor, you will definitely enjoy this film. Boyce adapted the story into a novel during the production of Millions and it was awarded the Carnegie Medal. Moreover, the film has several special effects and eye candy, but it deals with real ideas and issues, making it more than just an entertaining family film.

The film also includes everything else that I love about Danny Boyle films. The visuals, complex theme, a great music score, and writing all stand out as great bits that put Boyle as an excellent part of film history. In addition, Boyle manages to switch genres effortlessly and create a fantastic family film that can entertain both children and adults.

Millions was received extremely well by critics, but is overlooked by many due to Boyle’s success in the Horror/Thriller genre. Roger Ebert, Richard Roeper, and Leonard Maltin all praised the film as one of the best of 2004 with its enchanting story. Millions is one of my favorites, and is always an uplifting experience to watch, deserving a four out of four stars rating in my book. This film won Best Director and Best Cinematography, and was nominated for five other categories. The screenwriter was nominated, and rightly so. Taken from a short story that first appeared in the Saturday Evening Post in 1933 by Maurice Walsh, Green Rushes, Frank Nugent was able to weave a story rich in subtext and conflict.

The collector’s edition of the DVD includes an interview with Maureen O’Hara where she reminisces about filming The Quiet Man, and is well worth watching.